“Self Aware”

“Self Aware”

In a semi-serious conversation with my wife one evening, we laughed about the idea of robots who become sentient and rather than start a tyrannical reign and try to wipe humanity from the face of the earth, begin to act like humans: taking up our stupid fads like planking, Tebowing, and of course, snapping a narcissistic selfie. I loved the idea of creating a robot, so I worked up a sketch in my ever-present Field Notes to nail down the concept:   “Self Aware”  is created from a collection of recycled car and computer parts – only the sheet metal used to form the head is new. The fingers are built from two brands of timing chains, the monocle is an ellipsoid from a BMW headlight, the copper eye, shoulder and neck circuitry and veins in the arms all came from an old iMac used in another project. Originally, he was going to be holding a mirror, but the thrift-store vintage analog camera completes the piece. I had originally found an old-school Polaroid for this purpose, but it proved to be too heavy and caused the piece to lean and become unstable. The brand name “Instamatic” is not only a nod to Instagram, but hilarious in its own right, as I’d venture that there was nothing “instant” about using that camera! Also on Relatively Average: State of Arizona Wall Art Abstract Elephant Yeah, I became that...
Back to basics with Field Notes

Back to basics with Field Notes

Camping in the mountains of Colorado is sometimes about as far off the grid as one can get. Being 15 miles from my questionable (at best) AT&T coverage, I found myself going through technology withdrawal. Not because I felt like I had to be online all the time, but because there was interesting stuff happening all around us and there was no way to share that information with the world — which sounds like I had some kind of complex now that I think about it. Without access Twitter or other social networks, I could experience these happenings and try to remember to tell people later, or, more likely the case, forget because something else cool happened later that bumped the previous experience off my radar. I was able to take some pictures with my phone, but eventually it ran down, and it wasn’t all that useful in the rain anyway. Fortunately I had one of my trusty Field Notes Brand memo books and a pencil in my bag, so that became my Twitter for a week. One good thing about camping is that there is a lot of down time, so when something worth recording happened, like when the raccoon that broke into one of our containers, I could record it with a quick sketch and come back later when I had time in between fishing sessions or while waiting for the rain to pass to fill in the details. Now that I’m back and plugged in I thought I’d post the sketches.           Also on Relatively Average: Vacation Infographic On being way off the grid...